Conceptual framework of the review on HIV/AIDS-related problems and... | Download Scientific Diagram

The heart of a university’s business is knowledge. Its teaching and research functions are both essentially concerned with knowledge. Its ability to serve
society is based ultimately on its knowledge. Society invests heavily in its universities so that they may accumulate knowledge, transmit it through teaching and training, develop, elaborate and
evaluate it through study, expand and generate it through research, disseminate and spread it through publications and conferences, promote its utilization through engagement with institutions and
individuals within and outside the university world. Although the emphasis may vary from one university to another, each of these knowledge-oriented endeavours is found in every university worthy of the
name.

The presence of HIV/AIDS in a society does not change this mandate. However, the imperious demands of such a pernicious disease necessitate that a university
in a society affected by AIDS recognize that HIV/AIDS adds specific qualifications to its mandate. It is frequently stated that in a world with AIDS it can no longer be business as usual. Similarly, in
a university that serves a society with AIDS it can no longer be university business as usual. The HIV/AIDS dimension must enter into every facet of the university’s business, especially its core


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Editor’s Note:
The first AJAN Assembly took place in Nairobi on the
weekend of 26-28 September. The participants were: Fr. Provincial
Fratern Masawe SJ (East Africa), Mário Almeida SJ (Mozambique), Gerard
Andriantiana SJ (Madagascar), Florentino Badial SJ (Burundi), Papy
Clement (Zimbabwe), Augustine Enabulele SJ (Nigeria), Jean-Baptiste
Ganza SJ (Rwanda), Ludwig Van Heucke SJ (Kenya), David Hollenbach SJ
(USA), François Kanyamanza SJ (D.R.Congo), Michael J Kelly SJ (Zambia),
Serge Lorougnon SJ (Côte d’Ivoire), Douglas Manyere SJ (Zimbabwe),
Paterne Mombe SJ (C.African Rep.), Andrew Mtamira SJ (Zambia), Edoth
Mukasa SJ (D.R.Congo), Séverin Mukoko SJ (D.R.Congo), Francis G Munyoro
SJ (Zimbabwe, Kisito Nantoïallah SJ (Chad), Peter Norden SJ (Australia),
Ted Rogers SJ (Zimbabwe), Laurent Soukou Koffi SJ (Benin), Octave
Ugirashebuja SJ (Rwanda) and Gerry Whelan SJ (Kenya); and AJAN staff:
Michael Czerny SJ, Sr. Marie-Noëlle Munengela, ODN, and Elphège Quenum
SJ. As a summary of its work, the Assembly sent the following Letter and
Recommendations to the Major Superiors
and Jesuits of the African Assistancy.

TO THE JESUITS OF THE AFRICAN ASSISTANCY

Dear Brothers in Christ,

At the conclusion of the 13th International Conference
on AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Infections in Africa (ICASA) and of the
first African Jesuit AIDS Network (AJAN) Assembly, …


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Paulines Publications Africa-Flip eBook Pages 1 - 50| AnyFlip | AnyFlip

Dear brothers and sisters in the faith,

Dear friends, fellow believers and all people of good will,

 

“Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ!”
(1 Cor. 1:3).

We, Cardinals, Archbishops and Bishops of Africa and Madagascar greet
you in faith and with warm affection. Gathered in the 13th
Plenary Assembly of our Bishops Conferences of Africa and Madagascar (SECAM),
we have taken up the AIDS pandemic and its horrible consequences. In
doing so we have been very close to you, our dear brothers and sisters
who are infected and affected by HIV/AIDS and also to you who have been
moved to join in the fight against the scourge of AIDS.

I. We are in solidarity.

 

 

“For just as the body is one, and has many members, and all the
members of the body, though many are one body, so it is with Christ”
(
1 Cor. 12:12).

 

This eloquent image expresses well the solidarity that we feel
towards all who suffer, but especially towards you our Christian
brothers and sisters, who are one single body, with millions who
make up the communities of Africa and Madagascar. It is on


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When you look at the casino sites, you might wonder how it becomes as popular quickly. As you already know that the casino ???????????? sites have gained a lot of popularity during this lockdown. When the world was getting bored inside the house, the online casinos gained a lot of money. 

The online casinos become quite popular as many people who love to gamble gets their fun at the sides. You can easily use real money to win big rewards from the casino sites. 

Everyone invites their friend and play some amazing casino games at the house. It makes the experience more interesting for everyone so that they can explore different things. You can also try out the casino site and learn the reasons behind its popularity. 

 

Advancement in the online gaming world

You can easily find that there is plenty of things which help with the progress of the casinos. One of these things is advancement in the online gaming world. As you already know, the gaming industry has gained popularity due to various new techniques and technologies. So it also helps the casinos as they also implement these new advancements, which ensure that they get the best


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The heart of a university’s business is knowledge. Its teaching and research functions are both essentially concerned with knowledge. Its ability to serve
society is based ultimately on its knowledge. Society invests heavily in its universities so that they may accumulate knowledge, transmit it through teaching and training, develop, elaborate and
evaluate it through study, expand and generate it through research, disseminate and spread it through publications and conferences, promote its utilization through engagement with institutions and
individuals within and outside the university world. Although the emphasis may vary from one university to another, each of these knowledge-oriented endeavours is found in every university worthy of the
name.

The presence of HIV/AIDS in a society does not change this mandate. However, the imperious demands of such a pernicious disease necessitate that a university
in a society affected by AIDS recognize that HIV/AIDS adds specific qualifications to its mandate. It is frequently stated that in a world with AIDS it can no longer be business as usual. Similarly, in
a university that serves a society with AIDS it can no longer be university business as usual. The HIV/AIDS dimension must enter into every facet of the university’s business, especially its core


Continue Reading

The Church in Africa can do more to check the spread of HIV/AIDS
on the continent, an expert working with AIDS orphans in Nairobi has said.

Fr Angelo D’Agostino, SJ, MD, founder and Director of Nyumbani Home for HIV-positive orphans in Nairobi, said this
on Tuesday, December 10, 2002 at the launch of three videos on HIV/AIDS, published by Paulines Audiovisuals Africa. The ceremony, attended by about 60 guests, was held at the Paulines’ complex, Riverside,
Nairobi.

Fr D’Agostino acknowledged that though there is no cure for AIDS yet, “we can control it.”

“In the twenty years I have been here in Africa,” he said, “I have seen
the spectre of AIDS raise its ugly head higher and higher.”

He said since “the vast majority of cases are contracted by sexual contact in less than legitimate circumstances,” this made it a
moral problem as well.

“The most moral thing to do is to avoid getting it,” he said. “But until now, there has been, to my knowledge, no widespread, concerned, effective program of
prevention by the Church in Kenya.”

He, however, commended “the large Eastern Deanery [AIDS] program [of the Archdiocese of Nairobi], the many programs in Western Kenya, Nyumbani, …


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Well into his forties, Mr. Luboya was among the first afflicted persons to be
welcomed by “Parlons-Sida” (“Let’s Talk AIDS”) at the start of its activities in
the last trimester of 2002. His contacts with “Parlons-Sida” helped him to
discover and to accept his HIV status. A professional soldier, Mr. Luboya held
great store by his honour and dignity. He would only meet Father Séverin Mukoko
(or in his absence Father Rigobert Kyungu) in their offices where they also
receive other Christians of the parish, and never in the “Parlons-Sida” office.
Moreover, he had always refused to eat breakfast with the other AIDS sufferers
gathered in front of the “Parlons-Sida” office. He liked to wear a suit jacket.
A tall man, we witnessed his corpulence diminish little by little. We knew that
sometimes he would wear many layers of clothing under his jacket.

Destiny did not smile on him. During the last two years, we saw him pursue
relationships with two women. He had had other experiences before. Of these two,
one died last year when lightning hit the market of Balese (Mangobo-Kisangani),
killing six people and injuring many. Luboya’s partner was one of the victims. A
fortunate early death, …


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Wapendwa katika imani,

Marafiki, waumini wenzetu na watu wote wenye mapenzi
mema,


“Neema na iwe kwenu na amani, zitokazo kwa Mungu Baba
yetu, na kwa Bwana Yesu Kristo”
(1Kor 1:3).

Sisi Makardinali, Maaskofu wakuu na Maaskofu wote wa
Afrika na Madagascar, twawasalimu ninyi wote katika imani na kwa upendo.
Tulipokutana katika Mkutano wetu Mkuu wa 13 wa Maaskofu wa Afrika na
Madagascar” (SECAM), tulijadili mada ya UKIMWI na athari zake mbaya
kijamii. Kwa kufanya hivyo, tumeungana nanyi ndugu zetu waathirika, na
wale wote waliochukua jukumu la kupigana na janga la UKIMWI na athari
zake.

I. TUMESHIKAMANA/ TUMEUNGANA



“Maana kama vile mwili ni mmoja, nao una viungo vingi,
na viungo vyote vya mwili ule, navyo ni vingi, ni mwili mmoja, vivyo
hivyo na Kristo”
. (1Kor 12:12)

Picha hii bora inafafanua vyema mshikamano tunaopaswa
kuuonyesha kwa wale wote wanaoathirika, lakini zaidi kwa kaka na dada
zetu katika Kristo, ambao ni mwili mmoja, pamoja na mamilioni ya
wengineo wanaounda jumuiya ya Wakristu ya Afrika na Madagascar. Ni kwenu
ninyi ndipo tunapouelekeza wito wetu ili tushikamane kulikabili janga
hili ambalo madhara yake hayawezi kuchukuliwa kimzaha na yeyote yule.


Vyema mshikamano huu uambatanishwe na ufahamu wa
madhara ya kuogofya ya janga hili linalotusibu.
Mamilioni …


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The HIV-AIDS pandemic may be the most dangerous
threat to Africa since the slave trade and colonialisation. Nearly 70% of all new HIV infections occur in Africa, south of the Sahara. Of the estimated 40 million people world-wide who are infected,
some 27 million are African, and they will die within less than five years of developing full-blown AIDS.

HIV infection rates among adults aged 15-49 range from a few percent in some
west African countries to over 30% in areas of southern Africa. The virus, which is mainly transmitted via heterosexual intercourse, affects young men and women between the ages of 15 and 24 in large
numbers, women more than men. The rate of infection amongst older people appears to be rising as well.

Last year alone, an estimated 800,000 children under 15 acquired HIV – over 90%
were new-borns who were infected through mother-to-child transmission, and about 90% of those were in sub-Saharan Africa. Thirteen million African children have been orphaned by AIDS and are obliged to
fend for themselves and their siblings.

Ignorance of the disease is widespread among young people, who are at the greatest risk. Half the teenage girls in sub-Saharan Africa do not know…


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Lome, 10 December 2002

My dear brothers and sisters,

The peace of Christ!

It would have been a great honour for
me to be with you on this important day that officially launches AJAN – African Jesuit AIDS Network, but other duties equally pressing have unfortunately kept me away. Be assured that I am with
you in spirit and will pray for the success of this day.

The Jesuit Superiors of Africa and Madagascar (JESAM) decided to have a Jesuit network to co-ordinate the various activities
against the AIDS pandemic because they are very well aware of the seriousness of the situation. True they have learnt a lot from the Jesuit Refugee Service (JRS). And one important lesson is that they
have to respond to the neglected and the marginalised; the excluded, people whom nobody would like to take care of.

Today on the African continent AIDS is the biggest threat to the
survival of the African peoples after the slave trade. If nothing is done to stop its spread, it will empty the continent more than the slave trade did. The issue is not only those infected with AIDS
but also those affected by AIDS. Both need attention …


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